Judy Moore - Barrett Sotheby's International Realty



Posted by Judy Moore on 7/23/2017

After years in your current residence, you're ready for a change. As such, you've decided to add your home to the real estate market in the hopes of moving on to bigger and better things. Selling a home can be a daunting task, particularly for first-time sellers. Fortunately, we're here to help you maximize the value of your home and accelerate the home selling process. Here are three tips that will ensure you can become an informed first-time home seller: 1. Stay the Course. Although you may expect immediate interest in your residence, it may take some time for interest in your home to pick up. However, a patient, dedicated home seller knows how to stay the course and remain calm, cool and collected throughout the home selling process. For instance, a home seller may add his or her residence to the real estate market and continue to share the online home listing with friends, family members and colleagues. By doing so, this home seller may be able to stir up interest in his or her residence over an extended period of time. It also is important to remember that Rome wasn't built in a day, and much in the same vein, the first offer you receive on your residence might not be the best one. As a result, you should only accept an offer that makes you feel comfortable, i.e. an offer that meets your expectations. 2. Don't Sweat the Small Stuff. After you accept an offer from a homebuyer, the buyer likely will want to set up a home inspection. And if he or she encounters unforeseen problems with your home, problems could arise that may slow down the home selling process. If a homebuyer notices substantial issues with your home, he or she may rescind an offer or ask that these problems be resolved. Furthermore, home repairs can be costly, which means you may be forced to invest in expensive home improvements or risk missing out on an opportunity to sell your home. As a home seller, you may encounter obstacles as you attempt to sell your home. But when difficulties arise, try to focus on what's important – selling your home, maximizing its value and ensuring both you and the homebuyer are satisfied with the end results. A home seller who lets minor issues cause his or her blood pressure to rise may put a home sale in danger. Therefore, if you feel stressed, take a deep breath and try to work with a homebuyer to find a resolution that fits both sides. 3. Employ a Real Estate Agent. The home selling journey often is filled with twists and curves along the way. But with a real estate agent at your side, you'll be able to overcome any pitfalls immediately. Your real estate agent can promote and showcase your residence to prospective homebuyers. This professional also will provide expert tips, enabling you to streamline the process of selling your house. Remove the guesswork from the home selling journey – become an informed first-time home seller, and you can speed up the process of generating interest in your house.





Posted by Judy Moore on 7/16/2017

Dogs, like humans, are territorial by nature. If a stranger came into your home unannounced you would likely react in either a fearful or aggressive manner. Dogs who are aggressive and protective are no different. Fortunately, there are training techniques that can be employed to help your pet grow more comfortable when you have company at your home. Whether you have an older dog who behaves aggressively toward visitors or you are raising a puppy that you want to train to be comfortable around strangers, here are some tips that can help.

Know your dog

Before you start training you need to understand exactly what makes your dog uncomfortable. With some dogs it may be a certain type of person (like a mail carrier or the oil delivery driver). With other dogs any stranger who comes in or near the home is a trigger. Determine the fine line between your dog's comfort zone and where your dog becomes scared.

Employing a training partner

Start small by having a friend (someone your dog doesn't know) walk past your home where the dog can see. The moment they show signs of fear, assure your dog that you have the situation under control. Scolding the dog, grabbing them, or otherwise exhibiting aggressive behavior toward your dog will only exacerbate their fears. You want them to know that you have the situation in control. Saying firmly and calmly, "I got it; I'm OK" will tell your dog that you see the stranger and you're in control. Oftentimes, dogs bark at strangers because they want us to be aware of the potential danger. Acknowledging your dog is vital in these situations. If your dog is the type who barks or growls at strangers, reward them with treats when they don't bark as the "stranger" passes by your home. From there, you can try other triggers with strangers outside the house such as ringing the doorbell or walking through the yard.

Let the stranger inside

After a few sessions working with the stranger outside your home, it's time to introduce your dog to strangers inside their territory. If you think your dog will be aggressive toward the stranger, make sure you keep your dog leashed or basket-muzzled during the first visit. It will protect your training buddy and will help let your dog know you are in control. Start by having a family member let the stranger in the home while you hold your dog leashed at length. If your dog barks at the stranger, attempt to get your dog's attention and verbally reassure them you are okay; you are in control. Have your training partner avoid eye contact with your dog. Once your dog calms down enough to stop barking, try having them follow commands for treats (sit, stay, etc.). If this is successful, have the stranger try tossing treats to the dog as well. If your dog is too nervous to eat, reward them with pets and other positive reinforcement ("Good girl!").

Tips for productive training sessions

  • Try to keep your dog's focus on you as often as you can. Use treats and positive reinforcement constantly
  • Exercise your dog before training if they are high-energy
  • Train in small increments; if your dog is afraid of strangers don't start by introducing him/her to a party at your home
  • You need to be calm at all times while training. Your dog takes his/her cues from your behavior. If you get frustrated or anxious take a break and start again when you're fully calm

   





Posted by Judy Moore on 6/25/2017

The location of the homes you’re looking at in your search is key. You probably have at least a couple of cities and towns narrowed down, but do you know specifics? Is there a particular neighborhood that you would prefer to live in? The street that you choose to live on will also have a lot to do with the way that you conduct your life. If you live on the main road, for example, you’ll face a lot of noise and traffic. If you have kids, that may not be the ideal situation. There’s many reasons that living on a dead end street is the ideal situation. Be on the lookout for homes on cul-de-sacs and dead end streets in your home search. Read on to see the many advantages of living on a street that’s not a throughway.


The Traffic Is Significantly Less


There are very few cars that head down a street that’s not a throughway. No one will be using your street as a shortcut. This makes it much safer for children to play outside and it reduces noise in the neighborhood. 


There’s A Sense Of Security


Since there isn’t a lot of traffic on a dead-end street, it‘s easy to identify strange cars that are lurking around. The people in your neighborhood will all be more alert to any kind of unusual activity on the street. This allows for a more secure feeling in your own backyard. 


A Dead End Street Is A Great Place To Raise Kids


Your kids will have a bit more freedom to play and be kids when you live on a dead end street. There’s less traffic to worry about while the kids play, yet you have a great opportunity to teach your kids about traffic safety rules and how to act around strangers. Your children will also become close with other children in the neighborhood. The adults who live in your neighborhood will become acquainted with your children as well. You’ll definitely appreciate a tight-knit community if you have kids. 


Your Property Value Will Stay High


It’s hard to say that a home on a dead end street will decrease in value. With a strong community sense and safety perks, these homes will be in demand. When you do decide to sell your home, you’re sure to get a good return on your property investment if you choose a home on a dead end street.




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Posted by Judy Moore on 6/18/2017

Many people consider building some type of outdoor space to add to their home. There’s nothing better than being able to enjoy nature right from the comfort of your own home. The outdoors become an extension of your home when you build these spaces. A deck is one of the simplest ways that you can add something to the house and be able to make use of outdoor spaces at the same time. The important thing to know is that a deck is an investment. Before you decide to add a deck to your home, you’ll need a budget in place as you don’t want any home improvement project to become financially overwhelming. With that budget, keep the returns you could make along the way in mind


Curb Appeal


Really, adding a deck to a home is about buyer appeal. It probably goes without saying that a deck is something that can add a lot to a home and add to the overall value of your home in the case that you are looking to sell it in the near future. The best improvements that you can make to a home are in fact those that add value. It’s estimated that the return you’ll get on building a deck is about 65-90%. The bottom line is that the investment of building a deck does add to both the monetary value and the pleasure of a owning home.    


Consider The Area You Live In


Obviously the region or state that you live in has a big impact on just how much value a deck can add to a home. Especially in nicer climates, a deck will be great for just about any neighborhood. In regards to area, you should also think of the construction costs. Some areas will be more expensive than others to build in, but the overall investment could be worth it for the region.


How Will You Build It


The amount of return that you get from a deck depends upon how you build it. If you’re a DIY homeowner, you’ll get the most return by far. If you hire a contractor, the return will be less, but you may avoid hiccups in the building of the deck itself. The more complicated you make the deck, the more it will cost. These extras don’t necessarily mean that you’ll get as much of a return as you’d expect. 


Focus On Your Needs


No matter what you decide, building a deck has to match your own personal preferences. You want to make the most use out of your new space with you and your family. Build a deck that works for you. Even if your goal is to add value to your home, you don’t want to undertake a project that you don’t love in the end. Keep all of this in mind when you build your deck, or any other outdoor space in your home and you’ll be able to enjoy your home in bliss.              







Posted by Judy Moore on 6/11/2017

Homes in New England date back to the late 1600s. Some of these earlier, historic homes remain in good operating condition. Places like the Sarah Orne Jewett House, Castle Tucker, Gedney House and the Coffin House have become national landmarks. Four stories tall and large and expansive, covering several thousand square feet,these beautiful homes offered a glimpse into what lay ahead for housing in New England. Today, popular homes throughout the region, like those depicted below,continue to attract individual and family home buyers.

Historic to Modern New England Homes

Colonial homes in New England are large wood structures that are designed with lots of windows. Front sides on these homes are flat, absent shutters or eaves. Roofs on colonial homes are long and pointed at the top. These spacious residences offer lots of rooms, historic value and interior design options. A good way to distinguish your colonial home from other neighborhood colonials is by choosing a home that is painted in an appealing color.

Cape cods are seen throughout New England. A single walkway leads to the front porch, if the home has a porch, as not all cape cods have a front or back porch. Look for a chimney at the middle of the roof. It’s common to find shingle siding on a cape cod. These homes come with closed and open floor plans.

Georgian homes in New England are similar in style to colonial homes in that they are designed with a relatively flat front. Windows on these homes generally do come with shingles and are larger than those typically found on a colonial home. Another difference between a colonial and a Georgian home is the shape of the roof. Think of a triangle when envisioning the roof on a Georgian home.

Victorian homes are built with wraparound porches. Roofs on these homes are steep and multi-leveled. Some Victorian homes have one tall roof, its tip pointing toward the sky like a steeple. Other homes are built with two or more tall roof tops. It may be the expansive wraparound porches and multi-entrance ways into the homes that make these houses a win.

New England also boasts homes with contemporary or modern designs. Chic in style,these homes are constructed of field stone, wood or brick. They tend to be one level and uniquely shaped. As with historic designs, modern and contemporary homes offer lots of space and opportunity for you to exercise your interior design creative skill.

Major events that impacted America’s earliest beginnings happened in New England. One of the widest known and taught about events is the American Revolution. That period put cities like Boston and Lexington, Massachusetts and Groton, Connecticut at the forefront of American politics. It also helped to define early American culture. Homes early trendsetters, educators, business leaders, artists and activists lived in served as a model for future home builders. Popular New England homes continue to take on features found in some of the region’s early,popular homes.




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