Judy Moore - Barrett Sotheby's International Realty



Posted by Judy Moore on 10/10/2021

Image by Ángel Garcia from Pixabay

Many homebuyers are putting their pets first while looking for a place to live. They want a space that will work well for everyone in their household, all their pets included. If you have a truly pet-friendly property, then you can capture the attention of those individuals by marketing it as such. With that move, you’ll get your home into the hands of someone who will appreciate all it offers them and their pets. Here’s how to make that happen.

Think About Key Pet Upgrades

If you’ve upgraded your home with features that make life as a pet owner much easier, be sure to highlight them.

Fellow pet lovers will enjoy seeing upgrades like:

  • Pet grooming stations
  • Pull-out food bins
  • Hideaway litter boxes
  • Catio with catwalks
  • Backyard dog mansions
  • Etc.

Even simple upgrades, like heated floors made with pet-friendly materials, can go a long way in drawing in pet owners as your buyers of choice. As they envision themselves in that space, they can easily see how those elements will benefit them.

Talk Up the Pet-Friendly Features

Many pet-friendly features can speak for themselves, but it’s still a good idea to talk them up as much as possible. You can ask your prospective buyers if they have pets as you chat, and then point out the features that might sweeten the deal the most.

Then, once you’ve covered the benefits of each feature, be sure to step back and let them explore the place at their leisure. Before you know it, they’ll be coming back around to learn even more. Throughout your conversations, try to keep the focus on the buyers’ pets, not your own. Although it’ll be clear that pets lived in the space, you want to highlight how the space will work for the new owners rather than how it was used.

Let Buyers Bring Their Pets to Take a Look

With your pets out of the house, you can let homebuyers bring their own pets to the showing. Your real estate agent can put the info on the flyers, online postings and other ads to draw in the crowds quick.

To make all the visiting pets feel comfortable on the tour, have your agent put out a water bowl while setting up the refreshments table. Put well-labeled pet treats out on the table, so the owners can decide if they want to give one to their pet. Many pets have sensitive stomachs that do not respond well to different food brands and varieties, so put the package nearby as well.

As the pet owners look around the place, they can see how much their pets like the different features. Encourage them to see if their pet fits in the grooming tub or can figure out the hidden toy bin. As they try out each item and reflect on how it will make their lives easier, they’ll likely feel much more inspired to buy your home before someone else grabs it up.

Not many people are marketing their homes as pet-friendly, so by taking this approach, your home is likely to stand out from the crowd. You can then enjoy meeting with many pet owners interested in getting the perfect place for their pets — and receive a ton of offers on your home.




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Posted by Judy Moore on 8/9/2020

Photo by Ilona Krijgsman via Pixabay

Whether you own a cat, dog, reptile, or another animal, these critters are members of the family. But with cramped spaces and home layouts that aren’t very focused on the comfort and safety of your pets, you may need to make some modifications to make your home more pet-friendly. And given how your pets spend more time at home than you do, they deserve a high level of comfort. Whether you’re building a new home or you want to remodel, there are some DIY projects focused around upgrades for your pet’s needs. Keep reading to learn a few tips for how to create a pet haven in your home.

Space to Roam

Adventure is in the blood of our pets. From finding prey to reproduction instincts, our pets are meant to roam and explore. But with today’s means of living that include apartments and homes with small yards, sometimes exploration can be limited for our furry friends. If possible, try to create space in your yard for your pets to run around and play. If this space is limited, then be sure to take them to the park frequently—at least a few times a week. This will keep them happy and feeling their best.

Private Area

Just like humans, most pets need a private area where they can relax and unwind. If the beds of our pets are located near the kitchen, living room, or in other areas that see a lot of traffic, that can be very stressful for your pets, and they might not get the rest they need. That being said, try your best to find an area in your home that is away from the chaos and place your pet bedding there. Although some pets love to be in the middle of the action, this area can give them a safe, stress-free place where they can relax.

Observe Them

In order to find the perfect location in your home to create a safe and comfortable area for your pet, it's important to observe them. Over time, pets will usually find the areas of the home that are most comfortable to them, and they may sleep there and constantly spend time in that location. These are the areas where you should place their beds, toys or any other items that will make them more comfortable.

Make Things Safe

Whenever you have a pet roaming around your home, you should always make sure the environment is safe. However, not many people realize everything that needs to be done in this regard. Whether you have a young pup or an older cat, you should:

  • Always make sure the thermostat is set to a comfortable temperature. You don’t want it too cold or too hot.
  • Remove trash cans, place them under the sink or purchase a touch-free model to ensure your pet can’t access the trash.
  • Store cleaning materials and food out of reach of your pets.
  • Hide or tape down electrical cords, which can be quite tempting to chew for pets.
  • Put away shoes, toys and any other items that your pets may play with or chew.

Build A Pet Area

Pets do well in closed-in spaces. Especially if you have a puppy or young kitten, these spaces can also limit any chewing or destruction to your home and furniture. While a crate is a possibility, it's best to design an area where they have a little more space. In fact, this is an easy DIY project. Remember when you made forts as a kid? Now you can relive those memories by building one for your pet! You could move couches, tables, chairs, or any other pieces of furniture to create a closed-in space for your furry friends. In this area, be sure to add pet bowls with food and water, and don't forget about their toys! You may also want to lay down some blankets or bedding, so they can stay comfortable. This can create a safe pet haven, and this DIY project costs nothing!

Build A Hideaway

If you have a small pet at home such as a puppy or kitten, or even a rabbit, then it is very simple to create the perfect hideaway for them. Remember those old moving boxes you have tucked away in the garage? Well those can be easily be used as a pet hideaway! Be sure to fold out the boxes, tape down the sides, then cut out holes, so they can enter and exit as they please. You might also want to place some blankets inside the hideaway, so they stay comfortable! For added space and creativity, you can also connect boxes together to make a larger pet haven. To design a more permanent option, you can easily make one out of wood. These pet hideaways can ensure your pet stays safe, happy and comfortable!

By focusing on the tips outlined in this blog, your pet will love your home even more than you do!




Tags: pets   Pets at home   Pet Haven  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Judy Moore on 7/7/2019

So, you recently downsized your living space. You mentally prepared to adjust your lifestyle to a more compact living area, you reorganized all your belongings, implemented new storage systems and found the most effective furniture arrangements, but what about the dog? While the new living arrangement might be a little adjustment for you, it could be a more significant adjustment for your pets, especially for dogs used to a large backyard and play area. How can you help your pet make the transition? Try some of these tips. 

Design their backyard ahead of time.

Just as you investigated the best way to layout your new home to make the downsizing transition work for you, your dog will need help designing their new yard space to make the smaller area work for them. Start by separating and designating areas your dog needs as much as possible. Did your pet have a specific bathroom area in their old yard? It usually is in a corner far away from their play areas or your entertainment areas. Having a designated place to "go" is a comforting factor to your dog. It may be harder for them to find and keep a specific location in a smaller yard without infringing on their play area. Before bringing your dog into the new yard take a look at the space and figure out the best place for their house, potty area and play areas. Try keeping their home and the potty regions in opposite corners with a corridor, or the most extended angled area you can find, available for play. When you first introduce your pup to the yard walk them around the perimeter, introduce them to their house, and get them to mark in their new bathroom corner. You should do this daily for at least a couple weeks to help ingrain the different areas and help them separate the spaces in their yard.

Keep your dog entertained. 

If you have an outdoor dog that is used to a large yard, particularly if you have a larger breed, you may find that they are having trouble adjusting to a small yard. While they used to be able to occupy your time at work with chasing birds or squirrels and generally running around, they now have less natural entertainment in the small condo or bungalow yard. When you come home from work, do they seem bored? Are they very antsy? Are they tearing up your new yard looking for something to do? Depending on your pet's play preferences - chewing, tugging, digging - there are simple DIY backyard projects you can tackle to provide more independent play activities for your dog.

  • Tug of War - Installing an independent tug toy is a very effective entertainment source for your dog. You can DIY this set up using a fence or stair railing post, or by planting a large stake in the yard. Grab a short bungee cord and a long piece of thick rope from your local hardware store. Tie several large and tight knots at the end of the rope, then tie the rope around the center of the bungee cord. Wrap the cord tight around the post several times until it has no flex when hooked together. If you don’t have a post available invest in a long metal stake that you can secure in the ground, then use a medium size carabiner to clip the rope toy to the post. Introduce the toy to your dog and entertain them for hours.
  • Digging Area - If your dog likes to dig but can quickly dig up your entire new yard, try establishing a specific digging area for him. Take another corner of your yard, or a place along the side yard if you have one and dig out a small pit. Fill the hole with heavier sand or mulch to make it easier for your dog to dig. Convince them the new pit is the right place to dig by burring a bone, their favorite toy or a treat and show them they can dig to find it. Continue establishing the spot with your dog over the first few weeks, and they'll soon be burying their bone there themselves and have a new independent play option.

Maintain the yard. 

Work to keep your yard space clean and usable—for you and the dog. You may not have had to pick up poop daily on your larger property. It is now imperative to keep the bathroom area clean and contained. And, maintain as much usable space in the yard as possible. If you host a bbq make sure you clean up and restore any furniture that encroaches on your dog’s play area.

If you have a large dog who needs a bigger outdoor space, make sure you take up this concern with your real estate agent while you look for your new home, so they can help you find the best option for downsizing that keeps you and your pup happy. For even more life enjoyment expand your pup's living space with indoor activities as well. Spending time with you in your space is also good for the dog's stimulation. See part two of this article for tips on entertaining your pet indoors.




Tags: pets   backyard   family pets  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Judy Moore on 2/24/2019

If you're selling your home mostly as is, with carpet that's a few years old, you'll need to give it a complete and thorough cleaning before you show the home. Even if you recently installed new carpet, you may have had to continue living in the house with your pets before you put your home on the market.

Carpet.

Don't skimp on the carpet cleaning. A basic vacuum job is not going to be enough to remove any pet hair or dander tracked around by your dogs or cats. Hiring a carpet cleaning service will save you time but will require more of a monetary investment. If you want to clean the carpet yourself be very thorough and detail oriented.

First, make sure your vacuum is emptied and cleaned to remove any hair or dander inside. Vacuum all the large areas of the carpet before moving on to the edges around your baseboard. Move slowly around the baseboard with a narrow hose attachment and look closely to make sure you're removing all debris (especially stray kitty litter!). If you have multiple pets or full-time indoor pets, you will likely need to go over your carpets 2-3 times to completely remove hair from all the fibers. Don't take a shortcut, take the time to prepare the carpet for cleaning thoroughly.

Second, rent a carpet cleaner from your local hardware store or grocery store. In most cities carpet cleaners are readily available at large grocery and hardware chains for a daily rental fee. Rental companies typically provide the cleaning chemicals for purchase along with the rental. Consider purchasing a spot-treatment compound as well. When you start moving furniture you might find some unknown stains you'll need to remove. Spend the few extra dollars to rent the machine the night before you want to clean so you can start on your carpet early the next day.

Third, starting top down (if you have a multi-story home or unit) clear out furniture as much as possible from the initial rooms you want to clean. Be aware that the carpet will need time to dry so this project will take multiple days, depending on your home size. When working in bedrooms start early in the day to allow ample drying time so you can replace beds in each room and get a good night's sleep for the second day of cleaning. Before you start in with the machine check the carpet thoroughly for stains and apply the stain treatment before you clean the entire carpet, this will allow the chemicals time to penetrate the fibers and lift the stain for the best possible results. Once you treat the stains (following the directions on the chemical you purchased), begin carefully going over the carpet one row at a time. Make sure you overlap your rows and always move the machine in the same direction.

It will be difficult to see results before the carpet dries, but you should be able to gauge stain removal when the carpets are about 50% dry. Check the stains you treated and see if you need to apply a second treatment to minimize them further. If you expect your buyer to replace the carpet, it may not seem worth it to spend additional time on one stain. Even if they plan to renovate, many buyers have a difficult time imagining changes to their space without imagining themselves in it. A clean canvas can make the difference to whether or not someone sees themselves in your home.

Lastly, check your carpets for any areas that your pet (cat) has scratched up. If needed, trim a handful of fibers from an area of carpet that is unlikely to be seen such as the back of a bedroom closet. Trim the knap carefully, so you're only taking the top of the fiber and not creating a bald spot in a new place. Then take the trimmed strands and attached them to the damaged area with a hot-melt glue until you've covered all the scratches.

With fresh flooring, beautiful carpet and a clean canvas of walls and doors your home is ready for show. One last tip! If at all possible remove your pets from the house before you have prospective buyers over. While an animal in the yard is okay, the presence of animals inside may cause your buyers to worry about damage even if you have made the necessary repairs. Ask a friend or neighbor to house your cats and indoor pets during the open house, so you have the opportunity to best show off your home.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Judy Moore on 7/16/2017

Dogs, like humans, are territorial by nature. If a stranger came into your home unannounced you would likely react in either a fearful or aggressive manner. Dogs who are aggressive and protective are no different. Fortunately, there are training techniques that can be employed to help your pet grow more comfortable when you have company at your home. Whether you have an older dog who behaves aggressively toward visitors or you are raising a puppy that you want to train to be comfortable around strangers, here are some tips that can help.

Know your dog

Before you start training you need to understand exactly what makes your dog uncomfortable. With some dogs it may be a certain type of person (like a mail carrier or the oil delivery driver). With other dogs any stranger who comes in or near the home is a trigger. Determine the fine line between your dog's comfort zone and where your dog becomes scared.

Employing a training partner

Start small by having a friend (someone your dog doesn't know) walk past your home where the dog can see. The moment they show signs of fear, assure your dog that you have the situation under control. Scolding the dog, grabbing them, or otherwise exhibiting aggressive behavior toward your dog will only exacerbate their fears. You want them to know that you have the situation in control. Saying firmly and calmly, "I got it; I'm OK" will tell your dog that you see the stranger and you're in control. Oftentimes, dogs bark at strangers because they want us to be aware of the potential danger. Acknowledging your dog is vital in these situations. If your dog is the type who barks or growls at strangers, reward them with treats when they don't bark as the "stranger" passes by your home. From there, you can try other triggers with strangers outside the house such as ringing the doorbell or walking through the yard.

Let the stranger inside

After a few sessions working with the stranger outside your home, it's time to introduce your dog to strangers inside their territory. If you think your dog will be aggressive toward the stranger, make sure you keep your dog leashed or basket-muzzled during the first visit. It will protect your training buddy and will help let your dog know you are in control. Start by having a family member let the stranger in the home while you hold your dog leashed at length. If your dog barks at the stranger, attempt to get your dog's attention and verbally reassure them you are okay; you are in control. Have your training partner avoid eye contact with your dog. Once your dog calms down enough to stop barking, try having them follow commands for treats (sit, stay, etc.). If this is successful, have the stranger try tossing treats to the dog as well. If your dog is too nervous to eat, reward them with pets and other positive reinforcement ("Good girl!").

Tips for productive training sessions

  • Try to keep your dog's focus on you as often as you can. Use treats and positive reinforcement constantly
  • Exercise your dog before training if they are high-energy
  • Train in small increments; if your dog is afraid of strangers don't start by introducing him/her to a party at your home
  • You need to be calm at all times while training. Your dog takes his/her cues from your behavior. If you get frustrated or anxious take a break and start again when you're fully calm