Judy Moore - Barrett Sotheby's International Realty



Posted by Judy Moore on 11/28/2021

Whether you are a first-time homeowner or someone who is looking to take on a new hobby, it can be intimidating to begin with home improvement projects. Never fear — everyone has to start somewhere. These are the best home improvement projects for beginners.

Painting

The very best project for any beginner to take on is painting a room. There's a lot of room for error, but it's easy to fix your mistakes — if you even make them. You do not need any prior experience to paint a room for yourself. Not to mention, you may find the process relaxing and fun. Crank up the music, get your roller ready and transform your favorite room in the house into a space you can call your own.

Updating Hardware

Updating the hardware on your cabinets or furniture is a minor project that won't take a lot of time, but it will make a big difference in the appearance of your room. Simply go to the hardware store to choose your favorite handles and knobs, and bring them home to install them yourself. All you need is a screwdriver and about an hour to spare!

Installing Molding

Whether your home has outdated molding or no molding at all, you can easily install crown molding yourself to create an elegant and timeless atmosphere in your home. Most beginners find that molding installation is the perfect project to take on.

It is important that you are precise and careful, though. Make sure that you make the correct cuts and install the molding evenly throughout the room.

Design a Gallery Wall

Gallery walls are the perfect accent in any room, and you have a lot of flexibility in creating your own. Use a variety of elements, such as artwork, photos and mirrors. This will help you create an engaging design.

Once you have mastered a few of these tasks, you will have the experience you need to move on to intermediate-level home improvement projects.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Judy Moore on 11/22/2021

This Single-Family in Burlington, MA recently sold for $785,000. This Split Entry style home was sold by Judy Moore - Barrett Sotheby's International Realty.


33 Prouty Road, Burlington, MA 01803

Single-Family

$799,000
Price
$785,000
Sale Price

14
Rooms
5
Beds
3/1
Full/Half Baths
The home you've been looking for! Flexible living spaces galore in this spacious 5 bedroom, 3.5 bath Split-Entry with a legal 1 bedroom apartment with a separate entrance above the 2 car garage and an in-law set up in the lower level. Featuring gleaming hardwood floors on the main level, several recent updates including newer furnaces in the main house and apartment, some newer kitchen appliances, some newer replacement windows and more. You'll love the serene year-round views from the heated sunroom overlooking the well landscaped enclosed backyard. Enjoy outdoor fun for all while you "staycation" at home around your own private inground pool! New memories will be made here…… Welcome Home!

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Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Judy Moore on 11/21/2021

If you’re getting ready to buy a home, you know it will be one of the most significant purchases of your entire life. However, are you fully prepared for all of the expenses that buying a home will bring? You don’t want to buy a house to find out that you can’t afford it after all.


Many expenses go into buying a home that you can plan for ahead of time. Other costs aren’t as exact that you will need to add in your budget. Read on to learn more about many of the expenses that throw first-time home buyers for a loop. 


Closing Costs


Closing costs encompass a whole bunch of expenses that you’ll incur buying a home. These include:


  • Taxes
  • Application fees
  • Attorney fees
  • Title insurance
  • Reimbursements
  • Recording fees

No matter what the closing costs include, you should plan for these expenses to be about 2-5 percent of the price of your home. Costs can vary widely, but it’s good to have a bit of extra cash on hand.


Maintaining Your Home


While most homebuyers are prepared for the initial costs of buying a home, they don't know how much it costs to maintain a home. Each year, things will come up on your property that needs to be addressed continually. These tasks include:


Cleaning

Yard care

Gutters

Pressure washing


These routine tasks are independent of other costs like replacing a stove or fixing a furnace. Homeowners need to be prepared for these expenses as well.


Taxes


Taxes can increase or decrease for any given year. You can lookup taxes in the area where you’re planning to buy a home in order to prepare yourself. You should make sure that your property taxes are comparable with that of other homes in your area.

Utilities


Utilities are what your home runs on. Depending on the climate you live in the number of utilities you pay can vary. Take into account these things:


  • Heat
  • Air conditioning
  • Water
  • Electricity
  • Phone
  • Cable
  • Internet

Most neighborhoods have one or two choices for services, so you can ask people in the neighborhood what providers they [refer and how much their bills are each month.         



Insurance


You’re required to have homeowner’s insurance when you get a mortgage. Even if you don’t take out a mortgage and pay cash for a home, it’s a wise decision to protect your investment. Estimate how much a yearly policy will cost you ahead of time. 


This insurance will protect your property from things like theft and fire. You can shop around for the best rates based on policies that suit your needs. It’s easy to price out policies online. See where you can save including discounts for security systems or multiple policy discounts. 


If you live in an area where floods or earthquakes are prevalent, you should be aware. You’ll find you need additional policies to cover damage in the event of these disasters. The most important thing about your homeowner’s insurance policy is that you check the details for all of the fine print.       





Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Judy Moore on 11/14/2021

Image by Brasil Creativo from Shutterstock

If this is your first time owning a home, your mind is likely consumed with plans to replace the carpet or upgrade the appliances. You want to get the best deals and save money where you can. One area not to skimp, though, is in your homeowner's insurance. The last thing you want is to install the perfect spa bath only to have the sewer back up, and you find out your policy doesn't cover sewerage.

How can that be, you ask? Surprisingly, homeowner’s insurance does not cover everything. In fact, there are lots of things you may believe it covers that are nowhere to be found in the policy. While some of these things might be small annoyances, others can devastate your carefully laid plans for the perfect house.

Here are some big-ticket items that your insurance may not cover:

  • Floods: Water overflowing your property or home comes from many sources: heavy rain, tropical storms, groundwater rising, seepage, sewer backup, or water pressure from saturated soil (called hydrostatic pressure). The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) generally does not cover leakage, seepage, sewer backup, or hydrostatic pressure unless a federally defined flood caused it.

  • Sewer back: While not covered by NFIP, you may request an added endorsement to cover aging sewer systems and backed-up storm drains. Otherwise, you’re on your own for the cleanup and damages this causes in your home.

  • Mold: While posing significant home damage and health risks, mold can hide behind cabinets, in walls, under the floor, and in the insulation. With thousands of varieties, mold policies only cover infestations from specific species. These policies often have low upper limits, too, so the cost to remove it and repair the damage may fall to you.

  • Sinkholes, earthquakes, and shifting ground: Most policies exclude earth movement without specific riders. Your house may be located in an area that is prone to earthquake, mudslide, or sinkhole damage, so ask your insurance agent to provide the appropriate additions to your policy.

  • Termites: These wood and fiber-eating pests can destroy walls, floors, support beams, and other untreated wood in your home. Nationally termite damage repair is a multi-billion dollar business. Rarely do homeowner’s insurance policies cover termites. Your home inspection should reveal the presence of termites, so negotiate with the seller for termite remediation before completing your purchase.

Other items your policy may not cover are bites from pets, especially exotic animals or certain dog breeds, and accidents from high-risk toys such as trampolines and pools. You might be surprised to realize that most policies also exclude acts of war and nuclear power plant accidents.

Before you close on your home, discuss all your insurance needs with your insurance agent. If you need guidance, your real estate professional can offer advice.





Posted by Judy Moore on 11/7/2021

Whether you've just moved into a new neighborhood or have lived there for decades, there are many advantages to maintaining friendly relations with neighbors.

If, on the other hand, you adopt more of an isolated lifestyle, then the experience of home ownership may be a lot less fulfilling.

Taking the time to have a friendly chat with your neighbors, once in a while, can be helpful both now and in the long-term. While not everyone has a gregarious, outgoing personality, making the occasional effort to say hello can open the door to a number of benefits.

Home Security: The best neighborhoods are those in which everyone looks out for one another. When you know your neighbors on a first-name basis, they'll be a lot more likely to keep an eye on your house and let you (or the police) know when they observe any suspicious activity. It's also nice to feel comfortable enough to be able to ask your neighbors to watch your property while you're away -- either for the weekend or when you're on vacation. Even in low-crime areas, burglaries and vandalism has been known to happen, so it's in everyone's best interest to know their neighbors and be ready to help. Although Neighborhood Watch groups are not active everywhere, there's no reason why people still can't be alert and responsive to loitering, trespassing, or other questionable activity.

Networking Benefits: You may not need a plumber, electrician, or a reasonably priced HVAC technician, right now, but sooner or later, you will -- guaranteed! There may also come a time when you need emergency child care or fast help jump-starting your vehicle. You're probably not going to approach your neighbors for help if you don't know them, but there's a good chance you will if you do have a rapport. By sharing information, resources, and recommendations with neighbors, you'll be paving the way for a mutually beneficial relationship. While you may or may not become best friends, it's nice to know that there's someone nearby you can count on for support and help.

Feeling of community: Although some neighborhoods have a more friendly, close-knit feeling than others, it's often easy to break the ice with neighbors when you're outside -- either doing yard work, walking your dog, or going for a stroll. By taking the initiative to welcome new people into the neighborhood, you'll not only have a positive impact on their lives, but you might even forge a new, long-term friendship. You can also make social connections by chatting with people at yard sales, block parties, or by joining and being active in neighborhood Facebook or Nextdoor groups. While it may feel easier to just keep to yourself and avoid venturing outside of your comfort zone, becoming part of a larger community in your neighborhood (and beyond) is often much more rewarding!